Category: misc

Simple tidal

Here’s a quick demo of a ‘simple’ dialect of tidal. Basically it

  • avoids parenthesis, `#` etc, through a small, simple library of shortcuts (faster, slower, higher, lower, crunch, quieter, louder, skip, etc)
  • allows you to just put e.g. `”bd sn”` and it’ll assume you meant s "bd sn".
  • that’s it

I’ll be trying this out with a large number of 8 year olds soon..

Interview on CDM

Very happy to have an interview with Peter Kirn up on CDM, ahead of a workshop+showcase hosted by him in Berlin this weekend.

Inside the livecoding algorave movement, and what it says about music

Tidalbot is back

TidalBot is back! You can tweet tidal patterns to @tidalbot on twitter, and it will give you back an mp3 of the pattern, as well as a PDF with a visualisation of it.. Here’s a couple of examples:

As a bonus, the latest pattern is currently being projected into the shop window of Access Space Labs on Fitzalan Square in Sheffield.

Dance dance dance to the radio

I’ve had a couple of things on UK radio

On Mumdance’s show on Rinse FM, in the second half which is guested by fellow algoraver Renick. My bit is the melodic bit coming in around 1:22:50 which Renick mashes nicely.

Also on BBC Radio 3 late junction last night, available to listen again here for the next 29 days, but only if you’re in the UK sorry.

The Golden Age of the Future

I was really happy to be interviewed by Dean Honer (of I Monster fame among others) as part of an article in the excellent Electronic Sound magazine, which you should immediately go and subscribe to. The article gets to “There’s also Alex McLean …” via an unlikely route of superheroes, I spent a few minutes out of my mind with hubris when I read it. Great to be featured also alongside Chris of CPU/Computer Club, Heavy Lifting and Blood Sport who are all putting a lot into Sheffield’s music scene.. The next issue is out now so hopefully no-one minds if I share these scans of the article.. It was a Sheffield special with loads of good stuff, still available on back issue although be quick if you want one as they do sell out!

TidalCycles summer school

I’m running a TidalCycles summer school 12/13 August, full info in this post:

TidalCycles summer school

Computer Club in Igloo magazine

A reflective review of Peak Cut EP in Igloo magazine, part of a feature on Computer Club:

Yaxu, Alex McLean, doesn’t just use programs to make his sound, he writes his own programs. The first result, Peak Cut, has been set to memory stick. The style, dubbed algorave, is a mix between breakbeat IDM and playful plink. The entirety was constructed using McLean’s Tidal software. McLean sounds like a bit of a programming fiend. During live shows the raw code he knocks out is displayed to give visual insight into what is happening behind the laptop lid. Now I’d be the first to raise a cynical eyebrow if this idea didn’t work, if this were little more than a gimmick. But, the music speaks for itself. I can feel the other eyebrow twitch. USB Stick?! But in the spirit that this LP has it is arguably the most universal physical format today. Charming sounds, sometimes chaotic, pour forth. Absorbing and complex this is a style that involves the listener in more ways than one. The release offers you the chance to try your hand at sonic sculpting with Tidal, the software being part of the release. As the price of vintage equipment soars over on eBay this is the other side of the synthesizer. Open source and available, an emancipation of electronic experimentation. Before my rhetoric gets a little too early 20th century I better get back to the album. Percussion rains down, clambering atop one another as keys stagger through a sonic storm in tracks like “Animals.” At points the fuzz, fizz and flicking can become frustrating, but that soon passes. Peak Cut needs a number of listens and is at times, well, puzzling. But pretension is not part of the formula, instead this is picking up where a certain past left off.

I’m not really a computer nut. Yeah, I know we all use em all the time but I’ve never really been into coding and stuff. I never really got past BASIC, or past the first few hours with it. Yet, I must admit, I always liked the egalitarian nature that a lot of coding has. The sharing of ideas and software. The freedom to build and construct in a new language, one that would communicate something new. Computer Club have captured some of that vibrancy, some of that desire to distribute and that keenness to create. Who says you need to buy vintage analog equipment for exorbitant prices? Some labels of Sheffield say otherwise, and the results are plain to enjoy.

full article

Forkbomb.pl

forkbombThis is how it began, with a forkbomb.. In 2001, Ade encouraged me to enter the Transmediale software art award, that he’d won the year before. I ended up submitting this:

my $strength = $ARGV[0] + 1;

while (not fork) {
  exit unless --$strength;
  print 0;
  twist: while (fork) {
    exit unless --$strength;
    print 1;
  }
}
goto 'twist' if --$strength;

It basically creates a process that keeps duplicating itself, while printing out zeros and ones, creating patterns from a system under heavy load. It won (half) the prize, and ended up being part of the touring Generator exhibition curated by Geoff Cox and Tom Trevor, alongside Adrian’s auto-illustrator and work by other pretty amazing artists.

I’ve been co-curating the Thinking Out Loud exhibition at the Open Data Institute, and we’ve ended up including it in a couple of different forms.. A print of the original forkbomb output that appeared on the Generator exhibition guide, the (now rather scruffy) fanfold paper output that was printed during that exhibition, and a new print showing outputs from a range of different computers and operating systems contributed by some brave people (download PDF).

The original script, including some background and instructions for running it, is here.

BBC Introducing West Yorkshire

Just had some fun with Joanne on BBC Radio Leeds, here’s the recording:

Inhabiting the Hack

logo

During the latter half of 2015 I organised / collaborated with a range of “alternative hackathons” and related events re-imagining the role of technology in creative practice. I’ve now collected documentation including a range of videos on the website, it was a really great series of events to be involved with, together with dozens of really nice people. Have a look here.