Category: music

Vocable source released

The haskell source for my vocable synthesis system used in my previous screencasts is now available. I’ve been having fun rewriting this over the last couple of days, and would appreciate any criticism of my code.

More vocable synthesis

Another screencast:

As ever, feedback, both positive and negative is very much appreciated!

ASCII Rave in Haskell

I’ve been playing with using words to control the articulation of a physical modelling synthesiser based on the elegant Karplus-Strong algorithm.

The idea is to be able to make instrumental sounds by typing onomatopoeic words. (extra explanation added in the comments)

Here’s my first ever go at playing with it:


ASCII Rave in Haskell

For a fuller, more readable experience you’re better off looking at the higher quality avi than the above flash transcoding.

As before, I’m using HSC3 to do the synthesis. If anyone’s interested, I plan to release the full source in September, but the synthesis part is available here

Canntaireachd synthesis part two

Sounds a bit nicer now… This time with a smaller font and an exciting slither of my desktop visible. Sorry about that, see it a bit bigger over here

SoundVis

Frederic Leymarie and I have created a blog called SoundVis to document our research into the visualisation of sound and music. We’ll be adding our findings to it as time allows…

Canntaireachd for sinewaves

An early sketch of a system of vocables for describing manipulations of a sine wave.

The text is a bit small there, it’s better in the original avi version.

Vowels give pitch, and consonants give movements between pitches.

Inspired by the notation of canntaireachd. Made with hsc (Haskell client for scsynth). As ever, code available under GPL
on application.

I’m not sure where I’m going with this. It’s nice to describe a sound in this way but to use it in music the sound has to change over time otherwise it gets repetitive and therefore boring in many situations. I think I either have to develop ways of manipulating these strings programmatically, or ways of manipulating how they are interpreted. Both approaches would involve livecoding of course…

20010203 (translated)

Peano weave applied to a slub classic for Ade‘s birthday..

Higher quality AVI available at slub.org

Peano curve weaves of whole songs

Some nine months ago I played with weaving images from music, including using a peano curve as a mapping.

I’ve returned to this subject, having many good ideas to explore from recent discussions with Tim Blackwell. We thought rendering some whole songs would work nicely. I didn’t fancy playing with my Java code again so wrote some Haskell, which I’m rather pleased with. The source is available (feedback welcome!). It does the the mapping using seeks on the output file, allowing impressive memory efficiency via Haskell’s lazy evaluation.

Some examples of some indie synth pop, disco, minimal techno (*3) and industrial gabba below, click on the images for the full versions but beware, they are rather large, around 5M each. Mouseover for the original track names.

Boy From School - Hot Chip At Last I Am Free - Chic Ping Pong - Plastikman Ping Pong - Plastikman (different curve)
Ping Pong - Plastikman (with some colours) Unborn Baby - Venetian Snares and Speedranch

BP2-like polymetric syntax

Another experiment with haskell, rather hastily screencasted for your pleasure:

It’s using haskell’s Parsec module to parse the syntax, and sending the sound events to supercollider for rendering.

This is a work in progress, but GPLd source available is on request, as is an AVI version if you don’t have flash. All feedback much appreciated.

Live programming

I thought there wasn’t enough context on this log, so here’s a brief history of my experiences with live programming.

So I’ve been writing music in the Perl language for some years now. For the first few years this involved hacking together text based curses interfaces. However inspired by the work of the SuperCollider and ChucK livecoders, as well as my musical collaborator Ade, I began writing and modifying code during performances. As such, the language is the only interface to the music.

A quick example:

Or download as a slightly easier to read avi.

After a couple of years though, it has become clear that Perl is not the ideal language for music. The interpreter itself is good for it, allowing me to reload bits of code in a slapdash manner, and the TMTOWTDI philosophy behind the language lends itself quite well to applications such as music, where *how* you express yourself is somehow important, as well as the end result. But while expressing a musical idea as a bunch of general purpose while loops, if statements and so on is certainly possible, it does not inspire musical thought and experimentation.

The end result is that when I improvise music with Perl in front of an audience, I either make lots of simple, enmeshed polymetric effects and polyrhythms, or call up and modify scripts I’ve composed under less pressured circumstances. Finding myself exploring a new idea during a performance was possible, but rare. However, according to Jeff Pressing, this is true of all human improvisation — through practice we build up processes for generating musical continuations and apply them, with rare changes, during an improvisation.

So, my library of Perl scripts *is* my musical technique. Any musical technique I have as an human (as an entity separate from my computer) is largely lost to me during a performance. If I have it, I don’t have time to express it while others are waiting to hear or dance to something.

The answer could be to switch to a language designed for music, such as SuperCollider or ChucK. Frederic Oloffson and Nick Collins have reported good results after making themselves practice livecoding from scratch with SuperCollider every day for a month.

What I’m intending to try though is making a language built around the kind of music I want to make, able to cope with programming under tight time constraints, allowing vague specification of sound events but well specified enough to allow other bits of software to reason within the language as well as myself.

More to follow…