Stream to Algorave Montréal

A recording of a stream I did to Algorave Montréal this morning

65dos on TidalCycles

Pretty chuffed that 65daysofstatic, who are the best band, have been exploring TidalCycles while making the soundtrack to no man’s sky, and  happy that I can finally share this with you:

They’re using it in the first track, to control ebows on their guitars as well as triggering sample patterns. True to form, it’s a huge song. Here’s an article with a bit more info.

Are Algorithms In Tune With Music?

I spoke to DJ Semtex about algorithms last month:

You can read the full article here.

TEDx Hull

Looking forward to talking about Algorave, live coding, TidalCycles and a cultural grounding for it all in pattern at TEDx Hull tomorrow. I have been a bit unsure whether the showbiz 15 minute talk was for me but preparing for it has been a nice exercise in organising my thoughts, and I am now really looking forward to it. I’ll do some semi-improvised live coding, hopefully won’t crash and burn.. The rest of the line-up is really interesting too.

Spring things

Things coming up in 2017..

  • Running Tidalclub Sheffield with Lucy Cheesman – every third Thursday of the month, the third edition this 16th March
  • 17th Mar – Algorave wearefive – celebratory online stream with 48 performances beaming from round the world + clock
  • 23 Mar – Algorave Berlin – a really nice line-up, I’ll be playing solo
  • 31 Mar – TEDx Hull – a talk about algorave, and algorithmic dance culture
  • 22 Apr – Eulerroom 6 – haven’t done one of these for a while.. Hosted by Tidal Club, I’ll be organising with Lucy but not actually playing.
  • 28 Apr – Algorave Leeds – another huge line-up, live coding solo again
  • 16 May – Taking part in a panel session at Thinking Digital Arts, Gateshead
  • 26/27 May – Running a two-day TidalCycles workshop with the multi-channel system at Call&Response in South London
  • 2 Jun – Back to the Open Data Institute in London, launching the outcomes of my residency there
  • 7 Jun – An evening TidalCycles workshop at London Music Hackspace, Somerset House
  • 9 Jun – Algorave activity as part of No Bounds festival, Hope Works Sheffield, I’ll be performing with Joanne
  • 23 Jun – Talk and probable algorave activity at Bump festival, Brussels
  • 9 Jul – Canute performance at the Bluedot festival algorave, Jodrell Bank
  • 18-20 Aug – Another collab with Joanne at the Green Man festival algorave in Einstein’s Garden
  • 9 Sep – Organising evening performances at FARM Workshop 2017, Oxford
  • 8-12 Nov – Organising Algomech festival in Sheffield again

More TBA

PENELOPE

I’ve just realised that I haven’t posted here about my new job. I have left my post as research/teaching fellow in the University of Leeds, and since February 2017 have started work for a Museum, in particular the Research Institute of the Deutsches Museum, an incredible science museum in Munich — although I am still based in Sheffield UK. I’ll be working part time over the next five years on the PENELOPE research project lead by Ellen Harlizius-Klück, following our previous project Weaving Codes, Coding Weaves.

“Our aim is to integrate ancient weaving into the history of science and technology, especially digital technology. The project encompasses the investigation of ancient sources as well as practices and technological principles of ancient weaving. We set up a PENELOPEan laboratory where we detect the models and topologies of weaves and develop codes to make them virtually explorable.”
It’s a great privilege to have this huge chunk of time to really get to the bottom of something, an experience I haven’t had since my PhD. The project has much deeper connection to the world of live coding than it might first appear, being all about computational pattern, and the sharing of thought — but taking a much longer view of live coding than is usual. You can read more on the project website, including a brief exploration of making music from ‘tabby’ weaves.

Patterns are the time of numbers

Ok this post is going to look quite dry, but is actually very exciting, at least for users of TidalCycles. So first here’s a video demonstrating the simplified syntax the below blurb will allow in a future version (version 1.0, which will probably be released soon after the upcoming 0.9).

If you want to see more videos like this check the playlists on the TidalCycles youtube channel.

Anyway.. Something I’ve noticed at Tidal workshops is that beginners have problems with this sort of code:
density 2 "1 2 3 4"
There’s the pattern 1 2 3 4, denoted by quotes, and the number 2 without quotes. This says ‘make the pattern twice as dense’, so you end up with this every cycle: 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4.

Fairly straightforward, but why is the 2 a number, not a pattern? With more complicated, higher-order patterns this becomes increasingly unclear. There are ways to treat that number like a pattern:

spread' (density) "2 5" $ "1 2 3 4"
or ..
do n <- "2 5"
   density n "1 2 3 4"

… but now you’re converting between numbers and patterns of numbers instead of engaging with the music you’re making.

So I asked about this on haskell-art, in particular how to make it so a function like density could take either a number, or a pattern of numbers. One suggestion from Henning Thielemann was surprising – that Tidal’s Pattern type could be defined as a Haskell Number.

To cut this short it turned out that simply by evaluating a small amount of very simple code[1], Tidal’s syntax suddenly becomes far more expressive.

Instead of:
d1 $ sound "bass3" # speed "1.2"

you can just do
d1 $ sound "bass3" # speed 1.2

instead of
d1 $ sound "bass3*4" # speed (scale 1.2 3.2 $ ((+) <$> (slow 4 tri1) <*> sine1))
you can just do:
d1 $ sound "bass3*4" # speed ((slow 4 tri1) + sine1 * 2 + 1.2)

instead of
d1 $ up (every 3 ((+12) <$>) "1 8 [7 ~ 4]") # sound "bd"
it’s simply:
d1 $ up (every 3 (+12) "1 8 [7 ~ 4]") # sound "bd"
and with a quick re-jig of the definition of functions like density:

instead of
d1 $ n ((+) <$> ((+) <$> "1 2 3" <*> slow 3 "0 1") <*> slow 2 "3 1") # sound "voodoo"
it’s:
d1 $ n ("1 2 3" + slow 3 "0 1" + slow 2 "3 1") # sound "voodoo"

and much more…

By redefining density and friends, e.g.:

let density tp p = unwrap $ (\tv -> withResultTime (/ tv) $ withQueryTime (* tv) p) <$> tp

It’s then possible to fulfil my original aim:

d1 $ density "1 [2 3] [1 3]/2" $ sound "bd [sn:2 mt]/2"
while still supporting the original syntax:
d1 $ density 1.5 $ sound "bd [sn:2 mt]/2"

Basically, it turns out that if you let Haskell treat patterns of numbers as numbers, it provides extremely expressive means for working with them. This makes sense — patterns of numbers are numbers, just numbers which are polyphonic, and vary over (rational) time.

Lovely. This is a huge and unexpected win, which greatly simplifies pattern combination and manipulation, in the process greatly extending the possibilities that are within reach of a few keystrokes. This renews my suspicion that Haskell is full of much wondrous stuff just waiting to be discovered..

[1] Here’s that ‘small amount of very simple code’, if you want to try this at home:

instance Num a => Num (Pattern a) where
negate = fmap negate
(+) = liftA2 (+)
(*) = liftA2 (*)
fromInteger = pure . fromInteger
abs = fmap abs
signum = fmap signum

instance (Fractional a) => Fractional (Pattern a) where
fromRational = pure . fromRational
(/) = liftA2 (/)

 

Pattern Recognition

Text from an interview in the March 2016 issue of The Wire magazine with Emily Bick. I encourage you to subscribe!

The scene at an algorave is often what you’d expect from any good techno night – a dark room, engaging visuals, a decent, bass-heavy speaker set-up, and lots of people ready to dance. Except instead of a DJ up in a booth, or a producer tapping away behind a glowing Apple logo, performers at algoraves respond to each other and the audience in real time, often projecting the lines of code onto the walls as they type. lt’s coding as improvisation and experiment, and over the last decade and a half this kind of live coding has become increasingly visible, popping up at dedicated club nights and festivals around the world including Sonar, Ars Electronica and Transmediale.

Now Alex McLean, a research fellow in human/technology interfaces at Leeds University and one of the instigators of algoraves, has been chosen as the Open Data Institute’s first sound artist in residence, in association with Sound And Music. He had been working with live coding since 2000, when he met Adrian Ward, one of his partners in the long-running live coding ensemble Slub. “We didn’t really know what we were doing, we just had this idea of somehow wantıng to make music with programming languages. We all llstened to Autechre, and at the time the idea of the creative coder wasn’t…” he shrugs, continuing, “programmers were seen as people who implemented designs.”

Ward was doing a media arts course in Plymouth where he was introduced to generative music, “He started making his own software to generate his music, and just leaving it running on stage.” says McLean, “but when we met up in London, and started first talking about bringing this live, there was a new version of [the computer music language] Supercollider which allowed live coding, and also a new language. ChucK, came out in the States. It just seemed like there was a moment where everyone – OK, not everyone, a really small group of strange people – thought it would be a really good idea to start making systems for writing live code to make music.”

Tidal – unrelated to a certain Jay-Z connected music streaming service – is the open-source language that McLean created to allow quick- response improvisation, now used by hundreds of musicians around the world. “I felt the need to develop something that was more immediate, because I was working with percussionists and finding that it would take several minutes before I could make a sound.” Tidal uses simple, one-word commands to apply functions to a pattern, and can link several computers over a local network to sync to a control pulse.

Watching him work, chopping and changing the lines of code that controls his loops by changing a number or adding a word to change a function, is like watching a graphic designer who has memorised keyboard shortcuts and can transform an image in seconds. Complexity emerges from simple instructions. With a few keystrokes, McLean transforms an arpeggio and a simple set of beats into complex polyrhythms that pan in decaying arcs across speakers. He granulates sound patterns and reverses them, and creates blobby, queasy Aphex Twin-style textures before switching up samples to produce something nasty and sputtering, like the filthiest work of The Bug. It’s pure concentration and flow, and in an algorave setting it can throw up quite a few surprises.

As well as other coders. McLean performs with musicians who play traditional instruments, as well as live artists and choreographers. But successful improvisation depends on communication between players – and how does this square with the concentration needed to live code? He describes watching a video of a performance with collaborator Matthew Yee King, in their group Canute: “We’re next to each other on the stage, and there’s quite a lot of points where I’m iooking at him, and that performance was, I think, quite possibly the best I’ve done. There’s a lot of points where we both finish at the same time, just somehow communicate an episode so we time it and change, which has been quite rare for me.”

This kind of rapport becomes more difficuit when working with choreographers or performance artists.  He did another piece with the performance artist Suzanne Palzer, where she stepped on and off a platform. Her movement off the piatform caused the screen showing his code to go biank, and it would light up again when she stepped back on. She was, McLean says “trying to interrupt and interfere – and I was trying to remember where my code was! Suzanne’s work is about digital art but without computers, just these off and on movements.”

Apart from its use in improvising music. Tidal can be used to apply functions to patterns of any kind, not only sound. McLean will be working with the Open Data Institute to take aspects of large public data sets and represent them in new ways. In one of his academic papers that explains the pattern functions of Tidal, McLean uses visual representations – coloured blocks layered in rows to demonstrate the effects of functions on the code.

His examples look like knitting patterns, and another of his collaborative projects explores weaving. “The idea is to try to represent the weaves with code – and there are all of these problems.” he says, discussing everything from the three-dimensional nature and tactile properties of different materials to the ‘edge problem’ – many commercial textile software programmes ignore the edge of the fabric. “People think of code as being really complicated, and weaving as really simple and repetitive, but when you actually look at weaving, it’s incredibly complex.” He gives workshops to introduce non-coders to Tidal, and “people who haven’t programmed anything before start making music together in a couple of hours”, he says, smiling. “It’s kind of on the level of understanding knitting patterns or something like that.”

Emily Bick

Miserablism

(a thought in progress..)

Like many I’ve been preoccupied with thoughts about the writing of Mark Fisher, and his untimely death. As Nathan Jones put it, “Mark Fisher was a giant. Such a cruel irony that the man who so eloquently and honestly articulated the links between mental health, politics and economics would be taken from us like this, at this time.”

It’s OK to be unsatisfied with the way things are going, culturally, politically.

I’m starting to think about the next AlgoMech festival, and Peter Rollings got in touch about his Experimental Sonic Machines. He doesn’t have a website, but intrigued, I searched out this documentary someone had made about his machines and street performances:

I can’t really summarise this, it has to be watched. The work with found materials, the open, reflective approach to creativity, the machines, the self-deprecation against the startling, edgy music.. I love it.

There’s more videos on youtube, footage of some pretty amazing looking performances and constructions.. and also Rollings appearing on Britain’s got talent. From the start it’s stomach churning, childish playground bullying, mocking someone because they don’t fit with sickly, oppressive norms. After the previous video, it’s a miserable experience. Adds something to the classically-Guardian headline “Is Simon Cowell to blame for the end of western civilisation?

How can we strip away this awful, retrogressive misery, and make space for genuinely new culture+ideas to emerge? On this tip, it’s good to hear that Alexandra Cardenas is taking her live coding to street performances, like Rollings, finding public space to try new things out.

I’ll leave you with this from Fisher:

Algorave article on MixMag.net w/ yaxu mix

Here’s a thing, a lovely article on Algorave on mixmag.net, by Steph Kretowicz..

Among interviews with a range of nice folks it includes some words by me as well as this mix that I mentioned in an earlier post:

I really enjoyed making the mix – a real pleasure to get close to the music, and although I am very rusty (and last time was mixing vinyl), it still felt like a different way of listening, I’ve missed it. It was good also to bring such nice music together, looking forward to doing more of these.

Read the full article here: http://mixmag.net/feature/algorave/